Bizarre Bazaar: Tim Beckley's Marketplace Of The Strange




By Sean Casteel

When Timothy Green Beckley died in May 2021, he left behind a paranormal publishing empire that will forever be a testimony to one man’s drive and determination to learn the truth about both our world and the hidden worlds that surround it. His catalogue of books devoted to the strange and supernatural now numbers in the several dozens, dating from the present all the way back to the 1960s, when he began his first publishing ventures as a teenager.

Tim R. Swartz and I have shared the privilege of finishing up some of the incomplete projects that remained after Tim Beckley’s passing, the latest of which is called “Timothy Green Beckley’s Bizarre Bazaar.” The book is a compilation of shorter pieces authored by Beckley, Swartz and I, beginning with an introduction by Beckley’s longtime working partner Carol Ann Rodriguez.

Carol provides a rundown of the many authors Tim Beckley brought to the world’s attention over the years, such as contactees George Adamski and George Hunt Williamson, as well as Nick Redfern, John Keel, the Rev. Barry Downing, and Hungarian-born psychic Maria D’Andrea. Tracy Twyman’s “Sex Slaves of the CIA” is an indication, Carol says, of how controversial some of Beckley’s titles can be, making him the “King of Fringe Publishers,” a title he humbly welcomed.

Beckley also edited newsstand publications, like “UFO Universe,” for decades, and paid his dues by working as a freelance contributor to the “Enquirer.” He was invited to speak on the subject of UFOs to a closed-door meeting of the House of Lords in London and visited Loch Ness while in the UK.

Carol concludes by saying, “Truly, it can be said of Timothy Green Beckley what has been said of other greats: His like will not be seen again.”

THE TORCH IS PASSED

As one era ends, another begins. Beckley’s imprints of Inner Light and Global Communications are still in business, (mostly on Amazon.com) but have now been joined by a new imprint run by Tim R. Swartz called Zontar Press. “Timothy Green Beckley’s Bizarre Bazaar” is the first book released by Zontar Press and the hope is that there will be many more.

What can perhaps be most easily appreciated about “Bizarre Bazaar” is how it opens up a window into a large assortment of other books Beckley brought into the world. One of the more “controversial” titles worked on by Tim Swartz and myself, as well as by several other contributors, was “Screwed by the Aliens: True Sexual Encounters with ETs.”

THE SEXUAL FACTOR IS EXPLORED

In a chapter in “Bizarre Bazaar” entitled “The Sexterrestrials Are Here – And They Want To Breed With You,” the opening bullets ask: “Are you ready to explore a region of the paranormal that is typically relegated to the ‘ghetto’ neighborhood of UFO research? Does the idea of sex with aliens thrill you or repel you? You will likely be surprised to learn how commonplace sexual incidents onboard the ships and among the aliens truly are. It’s a frequent happenstance, but is rarely talked about, even among diehard believers in alien abduction.”

By employing several writers to tackle the subject of sex with aliens, Beckley was able to provide numerous perspectives on the issue that run the gamut from extremely hostile accusations of rape to more benign beliefs, like a benevolent hybrid breeding program that will ultimately save mankind from total extinction. It was Beckley’s intention to confront the sexual issue head on, from many points of view, and as honestly as the data allow.

A longtime acquaintance of Beckley’s, the artist David Huggins, claimed to have a romantic interstellar relationship with a pretty female alien called “Crescent,” whom Huggins called his “soul mate.” Their relationship lasted for decades and resulted in Crescent bearing the children of Huggins. He filled many canvases depicting his amorous adventures with the otherworldly woman and also put together a movie on their relationship called “Love and Saucers” that is available for streaming On Demand on iTunes, Amazon, Vimeo, Google Play and YouTube. It’s a fascinating reversal of the more frequently encountered horrifying atrocities of sex-related UFO experiences and may truly be a case of “Love Triumphant.”

When Beckley and his team of researchers were writing “Screwed By The Aliens,” the word “exophiliac” was unearthed. It means “a person who craves sex with aliens.” If, on the other hand, you shy away from the aliens and want them to keep their hands to themselves, you are a bit harder to classify, Beckley explains. “Astrophobia” is a fear of outer space and everything in it, so that would include ETs. “Xenophobia” is a fear of anyone from another place, often defined as “a fear of foreigners.” In any case, Beckley grappled mightily with finding language to fit the phenomenon.

BECKLEY’S SALAD DAYS

Beckley’s own contact experiences, as is so often case with those who have a history of encounters, began in his childhood.


In an early chapter of “Bizarre Bazaar,” Beckley writes, “While it is open for debate, I can trace my UFOlogical roots back to 1957, when I sighted two objects revolving overhead in the sky. One was hovering over an abandoned factory building across the street from where l lived in New Jersey, while the other stood still almost perfectly above the house that my grandparents owned. I didn’t observe any portholes, ‘little green men’ didn’t wave at me, but I fully realized – despite a pronouncement by the authorities in the paper a couple of days later to the effect that we were all hypnotized by the appearance of a couple of weather balloons – that these lights, objects, craft (call them what you may) seemed to be under intelligent control. Indeed, they were not bobbing and weaving in the air current. In fact, they seemed to know what they were doing (whatever that was), which I think – at least partly – was to get my attention and push me into unknown territory.”

The sighting experience changed Beckley’s life. He bought all the material he could find on the subject, including a copy of “FATE Magazine,” for whom he would later write as an adult. He started writing letters to the local newspaper, as well as pestering a couple of reporters he knew who shared his thinking on the subject, meaning that we were being observed by someone or something else.

In the ensuing decades, Beckley became an expert on the subject, published several nationally distributed newsstand magazines on UFOs, and eventually built his own micro-mini “empire,” publishing nearly 300 volumes on the paranormal. To see most of them, simply go to Amazon.com and type in Inner Light – Global Communications under Books.

Even more of Beckley’s well-spent youth can be discovered in a reprint of his earlier work called “Inside the Saucers,” which deals further with his adolescence in the thrall of the UFOs. The reprinted book is subtitled “Mr. UFO’s Teenage Years,” and was published in 2017.

“STUMBLE BACK INTO TIME,” the back cover beckons, “WITH THIS GENUINE COLLECTOR’S REPRINT OF A RECENTLY REDISCOVERED UFO CLASSIC.

HERE, AFTER FIFTY YEARS, ARE THE CONFESSIONS AND RECOLLECTIONS OF A TEEN UFO RESEARCHER TURNED SPACED-OUT ‘STUD.’

“As UFO satirist and ‘Exploring the Bizarre’ co-host Tim Beckley so righteously puts it, ‘A lot of boys my age were probably starting to think about girls and sneaking a peek at their father’s “Playboy” collection. Well, it took me a few years to get into the sins of the flesh (as it turned out, about ten years later I became a reporter for “Hustler” magazine). Instead, at 14 or 15, I was reading magazines like “Fate” and “Flying Saucers From Other Worlds.” And along the way I hooked up with a small collective of other blossoming teenage UFOlogists who eventually became part of the backbone of the field as it exists today: Allen Greenfield, Dave Halperin, Gene Steinberg, Rick Hilberg, Jerry Clark – this is as much the story of the early days of their calling as it is mine.’

“In 1962, Tim Beckley placed a notice in the Club News section of “Flying Saucers” magazine requesting correspondence and an exchange of information with like-minded individuals willing to share their knowledge about those silvery ships seen around the world, best known in those days as ‘flying saucers.’

“Through the personals column of this relatively obscure publication, he met several other teenagers who had started to form their own UFO organizations, so ‘Timmy’ followed suit by setting up “The Interplanetary News Service,” which issued a semi-professional publication that garnered a worldwide circulation of 1500 plus. Many members of his ‘youth group’ were well-established UFO experiencers and elder statesmen in the field. The INS became the third largest UFO group in the nation, behind NICAP and APRO.

“In order to finance his mushrooming enterprise, Beckley began to issue privately published UFO books and literature that would help further the cause and defray his expenses. ‘Inside the Saucers’ was the first such work. It was printed on an old fashioned (appropriately enough) spirit duplicator, and had a print run of 300 copies, which sold out in a matter of months. This ‘new’ edition is an exact replica of that first work, with only the addition of several photos and the elimination of typos.

“Regardless of the age of the authors, as can be rapidly determined, the writing is polished and sophisticated for its time in the history of UFO research. In this reprint of a rare collector’s item, you will become personally involved in a discussion of the following ‘long lost’ topics: A possible solution to the mystery of the Men In Black; How some UFOs may be the product of Nazi technology (a prediction made years before this concept was put forward seriously elsewhere); Possible synchronicities associated with the Great Pyramid; The Unidentified Submerged Object that plunged into a New Jersey

reservoir; A recap of the most dramatic UFO sightings and encounters from this period by “UFO Encyclopedia” author Jerome Clark; A detailed summary of 15 years of UFO research by George D. Fawcett; AND MUCH MORE!

“The late Brad Steiger, a longtime master of paranormal literature, had these fond comments: ‘Bless all those Teen UFOlogists! They were great supporters of a young Brad as he began his UFO career with “Strangers From The Skies” in 1966. . . Forever allies!’”

A DEMON WITH BLOOD ON ITS HANDS?

Amityville.

The very name of the small Long Island, New York, community instantly conjures visions of horror, of a death-dealing psychopath laying waste his parents, two sisters and two brothers with a Marlin rifle. The egregious murders were chronicled in both a bestselling book and a major Hollywood studio movie and have become, pardon the pun, a “household name”: The Amityville Horror.

The convicted killer was Ronald DeFeo, Jr., whom one judge called “the devil incarnate.” DeFeo told varying versions of what happened the night of November 13, 1974, including the claim that he was possessed by an evil spirit and had committed the crime through no free will of his own.

While it is of course impossible to decide the existence or nonexistence of the devil and his demons in a court of law, the evil-spirit-possession argument was entered along with an insanity plea. Ultimately, Defeo received a 25 years to life sentence for each of his victims and remains in prison today.

But is it so easy to simply scoff at Defeo’s claim to have been an unwitting agent for the devil? Could it possibly be that Defeo was telling the truth of what happened?

This is one of many issues dealt with in the book issued by Timothy Green Beckley’s Global Communications/Conspiracy Journal publishing house. Entitled “Amityville and Beyond, The Lore of the Poltergeist and Other Petrifying Paranormal Phenomena,” the book breaks new ground in making some overdue correlations between spirit possession, ghosts and even the UFO/alien presence. What Beckley and his writers are aiming for is to make apparent an overarching “theory of everything” that ties up the loose ends of many different forms of paranormal activity in the world today.

A PARANORMAL RESEARCHER’S EARLY POLTERGEIST ENCOUNTER

Paul Eno is among the topnotch researchers Beckley assembled for the writing of “Amityville and Beyond.” Currently Eno hosts, along with his son Ben, a radio show called “Behind the Paranormal” based in Woonsocket, Rhode Island.

“American history is full of poltergeists and nasty and vengeful spirits,” Eno writes. “We’ve written about the Bell Witch that frightened a U.S. president so badly that he fled in the early morning hours from a Tennessee homestead. Furthermore, this book contains the full story of the dreadful Amherst poltergeist, which is just as scary as any similar saga of evil you are likely to hear about from an historical perspective.

“My attitude about such cases,” Eno continues, “is a bit more ‘radical’ than the views of other researchers, who tend to treat such poltergeist outbreaks as either restless spirits gone awry or put them in the general category of a purely psychological manifestation attributable to the witnesses’ psychological state. I see such outbreaks more akin to a crossing of parallel dimensions by a variety of beings often mistaken for the undead – though they seem to have, in many instances, the same attributes as so-called ‘aliens.’ Even cryptids from the darkest realms of our minds have recently been brought into the poltergeist equation.”

Here Eno has very succinctly expressed the overall theme of “Amityville and Beyond,” that aliens and cryptid creatures like Dogmen are cut from the same cloth as “noisy ghosts” and possessive demons. Eno at one time was an assistant to the famed Ed and Lorraine Warren, the husband/wife paranormal researchers whose work has been the subject of the movies “The Conjuring” and “The Conjuring 2.”

In November 1974, Eno found himself on Lindley Street in Bridgeport, Connecticut, along with Ed, Lorraine and Father William Charbonneau, and an indeterminate number of police and reporters. And a very frightened little family.

“The latter consisted of Gerard Goodin and his adopted daughter and only child, Marcia (pronounced Mar-SEE-a),” Eno writes. “Shortly Mom (Laura Goodin) returned from the St. Vincent’s Hospital Emergency Room with her right big toe bandaged. It had been broken by a flying television set. The house itself was a mess. ‘The Thing,’ as Laura called it, had been tearing pictures, especially religious objects, off the wall all morning. A priest had come to bless the house, apparently to no avail.”

Calling it the best-witnessed poltergeist event in history, Eno says that violent phenomena were witnessed by almost 100 people in the Bridgeport outbreak. Eno was on the scene himself when some of the bizarre incidents transpired.

“I stood in the kitchen,” Eno writes, “with three firefighters on one side of me and three police officers on the other and watched the refrigerator float off the floor, turn right, turn back, then settle gently back to the floor. Late in the evening of that first day, I was sitting at the kitchen table with Lorraine. Also in the kitchen was a huge police officer, Ed Warren and a reporter from WNAB Radio. Lorraine suddenly let out a yelp. I watched as a second-degree burn, with its trademark white blister, appeared on Lorraine’s left hand, between thumb and forefinger. This was all caught on the radio reporter’s tape, which still exists. You can hear a youthful me stating, ‘There’s a blister forming!’”

TOUCHING THE NEAR-INVISIBLE


At another point during Eno’s visits to the Bridgeport home, he was alone in the house with the Goodins, playing monopoly with Marcia to pass the time and to help her relax.

“Suddenly an acrid smell, like ozone mixed with sulfur, came from the kitchen,” Eno recounts. “Instantly Gerard Goodin was up, dashed into the kitchen and started chanting in Latin! My skin tingled with an electrical charge that I now associate with the electromagnetic ‘branes,’ as physicists call them, presumably the boundaries between parallel worlds.

“A whitish, gauzy cloud began to form in the kitchen,” Eno continues, “and Goodin was back in the living room at once. I was convinced that four entities were ‘arriving’ in the kitchen from Marcia’s adjacent bedroom. They weren’t entirely invisible, and there were four distinct shapes coming from the kitchen in a line. They were each about four and a half feet high and had rounded tops, with no discernible head or shoulders.”

Goodin saw the figures also, and he followed one as it moved from the kitchen. As the mystery entities entered the living room one by one, Laura Goodin started to cry while Marcia clung to Eno for comfort. Then one of the almost-invisible things approached Eno and stopped.

“That’s when I made my mistake,” Eno confesses. “I began to feel angry toward this thing, which at the time I thought was a demon in the classic, theological sense. I was angry because it was obviously trying to get to this child. The whatever-it-was simply fed on the negative energy I was releasing and grew stronger.

“What happened next was the biggest shock I’d experienced in paranormal work up to that time. As the entity moved to get around me and at the girl, I instinctively pushed toward it. It resisted as though it was entirely material. In fact, I felt flesh and bone structure as if this were a solid being. These ‘demons’ were supposed to be spirits!”

Eno says it took him many years to come to grips with the experience, let alone explain it in terms of parallel worlds. He never even reported it to the Warrens, and it was decades before he could write or speak about it.

“While I stood there dazed,” he continues, “the entity got around me and threw Marcia across the living room. She ran back to me, crying. Finally, as the gauzy cloud inundated the whole interior of the house, and as I tired from, I would say today, being drained by this powerful parasite, I ordered everyone outside.”

Although the police had cleared away the crowds and cordoned off both ends of Lindley Street, there were still thousands of onlookers gawking from each end of the block.

“I could hear a voice in the crowd,” Eno writes, “preaching something about all this being a ‘sign of the end.’ These being the days long before cell phones, I had to use a neighbor’s phone to call the Warrens. It took them an hour to get back into the city because of all the traffic caused by this paranormal circus. When they finally arrived at about 9:15 P.M., we all reentered the house. Things were quiet.”

When Eno writes about the creature he pushed against as being almost invisible yet possessing a flesh and bone structure, what manner of being is this? It sounds not unlike the physical-yet-not-physical “bodies” of the familiar gray aliens whose stock in trade is the abduction of chosen subjects for whatever dark reasons are left for us to discover. As Eno so clearly explains, the aliens and demons who cross between dimensions may be one and the same entity but are given different names in scripture and folklore that vary according to who encounters the strange interlopers.

AND THEN THE TERROR SPOKE . . .

Evil speaking voices are also dealt with in a chapter of “Amity and Beyond” by Tim R. Swartz called “When the Poltergeist Finds Its Voice.”

“It can be terrifying enough,” Swartz writes, “when a poltergeist makes its appearance in a household. Rocks thrown about, strange bangs on the walls, moving furniture, items disappearing and then reappearing – this is enough to set anyone on edge. However, when a poltergeist finds its voice and starts to talk, you know that events have decidedly taken a turn for the worse.

“Poltergeist activity has been recorded throughout history,” Swartz goes on, “and is probably the most prolific of all supernatural events. A poltergeist is extremely aware of its surroundings and will often quickly respond to suggestions by observers and other external stimuli. This shows that there is some kind of ‘intelligence’ behind its pranks and not just some random psychokinesis (PK). This intelligence, along with an ability to communicate, will manifest in a myriad of ways. Pieces of paper with strange messages appear; writing on the walls; children’s toys will be arranged to make words; and, perhaps the most shocking, they will sometimes start to speak out loud.”

According to Swartz, when a poltergeist achieves speech, it generally starts as animal-like growls and whispers that slowly evolve into discernible words. Most poltergeists never reach this stage in their development, but, once they do, a clear “personality” emerges from what were previously just random events.

Swartz recounts some case histories in the annals of poltergeist hauntings in which the intruding spirit spoke to its victims.

The 1817 case of the “Bell Witch,” the name for the poltergeist who took up residence among a Tennessee farming family headed by John Bell, Sr., is an interesting example. “The Witch” was extremely talkative and could imitate the voices of people from the area.

“The poltergeist was said to speak at a nerve-wracking pitch when displeased,” Swartz reports, “while at other times it sang and talked in low musical tones. In one instance, it was alleged to have repeated, verbatim, sermons administered by two preachers, occurring at separate locations, that took place simultaneously. The sermons recited by the witch were verified by people attending the churches as being identical in voice, tone, inflection and content. The poltergeist was even known to attend church and sing along with the congregation, using the most beautiful voice anyone had ever heard.”